A day in Roatan, Bay Islands, Honduras (NCL 7-day cruise, Day 3)

The first thing to remember when traveling on vacation anywhere, anytime, is to prepare for anything. And learn how to roll with things when they don’t go the way you planned. Because it will happen at least once. And you will make everyone else around you miserable if you don’t get over it fast.

Our first port of call was Roatan, Honduras. We had originally booked a snuba excursion for the day and I was super excited to dive the world’s 2nd largest barrier reef. I was also very much hoping we’d be lucky enough to see whale sharks, since Honduras is known for sightings. Needless to say, I was definitely more than disappointed when our excursion was canceled due to weather and poor visibility. It was cloudy and only rained for about 5 minutes but whatever. I probably wasn’t going to see whale sharks anyway so who cares.

But really, it sucked and without wanting to risk booking a 2nd trip and getting rained on, we opted to just wing it and figure it out when we got ashore. This doesn’t always work out (and for a hot minute I was definitely sure we were going to be robbed and murdered, or at the very least dropped somewhere in the jungle), but somehow it worked out well in the end and we were able to see some of the small island on our own terms.

We hired a driver to take us around the island and then to the West End Village for lunch. He spoke very little English, which we were not aware of until we were already in his cab and out on the road. I like to have conversations with our drivers so I can ask questions about the country, so I was definitely bummed we couldn’t get info about the island while we cruised around. It was also slightly uncomfortable knowing he could just take us off somewhere sketchy and we would have no way to ask what the fuck. Although I’m sure if that were to happen, by that point speaking the same language wouldn’t really even matter.

But as far as wanting to get some extra tips and education about the country you’re visiting, definitely request an English-speaking driver when you pay for a tour or service on your own. Or just be better at languages and make sure you or someone in your party is bilingual.

After I realized we weren’t going to be murdered (it’s a legitimate concern in some of these countries), I just enjoyed the quiet in our cab as we cruised the countryside. I’ve been in other countries with similar geography, so I wasn’t too alarmed by the narrow, winding roads and how fast and close to each other everyone drives. But if you’ve never been to the Caribbean or Central/South America, be prepared for this. It’s really not as terrifying as it seems at first.

birdWe stopped for a quick tour of a local monkey farm (which I didn’t really want to do, but apparently “no” doesn’t translate the same from English to Spanish…). I don’t like seeing animals in cages, but we went anyway and I got to have a local monkey and bird sit on my head and eat things off my shoulder. So if you’re into that sort of thing, it was $10/person and I don’t remember what the park was called, so figure it out yourself. Sorry.

We ended our private cab tour at Half Moon Resort for lunch. I had the coconut shrimp, which was delicious. Probably the best coconut shrimp I’ve ever had, hands down. We enjoyed our lunch on their oceanfront dining deck, with the surf crashing up and around us. It was picturesque. I also quickly realized it was a dive resort, which made me wish Kevin was certified already. It definitely seemed like a place that I’d want to go back to and stay at specifically for that reason, so anyone who’s also scuba certified, check it out and let me know if it’s worth it.

All in all, visually, Honduras was a beautiful, tropical paradise, one I hope to revisit again someday and see what its ocean depths have to offer.

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View of Half Moon Bay from Half Moon Resort

If you’re planning your own cruise, check out my 12 tips to cruise stress-free post.

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